Quantum Hall effects offer a formidable playground for the investigation of quantum transport phenomena. Edge modes can be deflected, branched, and mixed by designing a suitable potential landscape in a two-dimensional conducting system subject to a strong magnetic field. In the present work, we demonstrate a buried split-gate architecture and use it to control electron conduction in large-scale single-crystal monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The control of the edge trajectories is demonstrated by the observation of various fractional quantum resistances, as a result of a controllable interedge scattering. Experimental data are successfully modeled both numerically and analytically within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our architecture is particularly promising and unique in view of the investigation of quantum transport via scanning probe microscopy, since graphene constitutes the topmost layer of the device. For this reason, it can be approached and perturbed by a scanning probe down to the limit of mechanical contact.

Quantum Hall effects offer a formidable playground for the investigation of quantum transport phenomena. Edge modes can be deflected, branched, and mixed by designing a suitable potential landscape in a two-dimensional conducting system subject to a strong magnetic field. In the present work, we demonstrate a buried split-gate architecture and use it to control electron conduction in large-scale single-crystal monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The control of the edge trajectories is demonstrated by the observation of various fractional quantum resistances, as a result of a controllable interedge scattering. Experimental data are successfully modeled both numerically and analytically within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our architecture is particularly promising and unique in view of the investigation of quantum transport via scanning probe microscopy, since graphene constitutes the topmost layer of the device. For this reason, it can be approached and perturbed by a scanning probe down to the limit of mechanical contact.

Interedge backscattering in buried split-gate-defined graphene quantum point contacts

Xiang S.;Guiducci S.;Beltram F.;Roddaro S.;Heun S.
2016

Abstract

Quantum Hall effects offer a formidable playground for the investigation of quantum transport phenomena. Edge modes can be deflected, branched, and mixed by designing a suitable potential landscape in a two-dimensional conducting system subject to a strong magnetic field. In the present work, we demonstrate a buried split-gate architecture and use it to control electron conduction in large-scale single-crystal monolayer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The control of the edge trajectories is demonstrated by the observation of various fractional quantum resistances, as a result of a controllable interedge scattering. Experimental data are successfully modeled both numerically and analytically within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our architecture is particularly promising and unique in view of the investigation of quantum transport via scanning probe microscopy, since graphene constitutes the topmost layer of the device. For this reason, it can be approached and perturbed by a scanning probe down to the limit of mechanical contact.
Settore FIS/03 - Fisica della Materia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11384/101216
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