Metal ions play crucial roles in protein- and ligand-mediated interactions. They not only act as catalysts to facilitate biological processes but are also important as protein structural elements. Accurately predicting metal ion interactions in computational studies has always been a challenge, and various methods have been suggested to improve these interactions. One such method is the 12-6-4 Lennard-Jones (LJ)-type nonbonded model. Using this model, it has been possible to successfully reproduce the experimental properties of metal ions in aqueous solution. The model includes induced dipole interactions typically ignored in the standard 12-6 LJ nonbonded model. In this we expand the applicability of this model to metal ion-carboxylate interactions. Using 12-6-4 parameters that reproduce the solvation free energies of the metal ions leads to an overestimation of metal ion-acetate interactions, thus, prompting us to fine-tune the model to specifically handle the latter. We also show that the standard 12-6 LJ model significantly falls short in reproducing the experimental binding free energy between acetate and 11 metal ions (Ni(II), Mg(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(I), Fe(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Ca(II), and Ag(I)). In this study, we describe optimized C4 parameters for the 12-6-4 LJ nonbonded model to be used with three widely employed water models (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 3 Points (TIP3P), Simple Point Charge Extended (SPC/E), and Optimal Point Charge (OPC) water models). These parameters can accurately match the experimental binding free energy between 11 metal ions and acetate. These parameters can be applied to the study of metalloproteins and transition metal ion channels and transporters, as acetate serves as a representative of the negatively charged amino acid side chains from aspartate and glutamate.

Thermodynamics of Metal–Acetate Interactions

Sagresti, Luca;Brancato, Giuseppe;
2024

Abstract

Metal ions play crucial roles in protein- and ligand-mediated interactions. They not only act as catalysts to facilitate biological processes but are also important as protein structural elements. Accurately predicting metal ion interactions in computational studies has always been a challenge, and various methods have been suggested to improve these interactions. One such method is the 12-6-4 Lennard-Jones (LJ)-type nonbonded model. Using this model, it has been possible to successfully reproduce the experimental properties of metal ions in aqueous solution. The model includes induced dipole interactions typically ignored in the standard 12-6 LJ nonbonded model. In this we expand the applicability of this model to metal ion-carboxylate interactions. Using 12-6-4 parameters that reproduce the solvation free energies of the metal ions leads to an overestimation of metal ion-acetate interactions, thus, prompting us to fine-tune the model to specifically handle the latter. We also show that the standard 12-6 LJ model significantly falls short in reproducing the experimental binding free energy between acetate and 11 metal ions (Ni(II), Mg(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(I), Fe(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Ca(II), and Ag(I)). In this study, we describe optimized C4 parameters for the 12-6-4 LJ nonbonded model to be used with three widely employed water models (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 3 Points (TIP3P), Simple Point Charge Extended (SPC/E), and Optimal Point Charge (OPC) water models). These parameters can accurately match the experimental binding free energy between 11 metal ions and acetate. These parameters can be applied to the study of metalloproteins and transition metal ion channels and transporters, as acetate serves as a representative of the negatively charged amino acid side chains from aspartate and glutamate.
2024
Settore CHIM/02 - Chimica Fisica
Free energy; Ions; Metals; Molecules; Organic compounds
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11384/137484
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