The formyl cation (HCO+) is one of the most abundant ions in molecular clouds and plays a major role in the interstellar chemistry. For this reason, accurate collisional rate coefficients for the rotational excitation of HCO+ and its isotopes due to the most abundant perturbing species in interstellar environments are crucial for non-local thermal equilibrium models and deserve special attention. In this work, we determined the first hyperfine resolved rate coefficients of HC17O+ in collision with H2 (j = 0). Indeed, despite no scattering calculations on its collisional parameters have been performed so far, the HC17O+ isotope assumes a prominent role for astrophysical modelling applications. Computations are based on a new four dimensional (4D) potential energy surface obtained at the CCSD(T)-F12a/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. A test on the corresponding cross-section values pointed out that, to a good approximation, the influence of the coupling between rotational levels of H2 can be ignored. For this reason, the H2 collider has been treated as a spherical body and an average of the potential based on five orientations of H2 has been employed for scattering calculations. State-to-state rate coefficients resolved for the HC17O+ hyperfine structure for temperature ranging from 5 to 100K have been computed using recoupling techniques. This study provides the first determination of HC17O+–H2 inelastic rate coefficients directly computed from full quantum close-coupling equations, thus supporting the reliability of future radiative transfer modellings of HC17O+ in interstellar environments.

Hyperfine resolved rate coefficients of HC17O+ with H2 (j = 0)

Tonolo Francesca
;
Melosso Mattia;Puzzarini Cristina;Bizzocchi Luca
2022

Abstract

The formyl cation (HCO+) is one of the most abundant ions in molecular clouds and plays a major role in the interstellar chemistry. For this reason, accurate collisional rate coefficients for the rotational excitation of HCO+ and its isotopes due to the most abundant perturbing species in interstellar environments are crucial for non-local thermal equilibrium models and deserve special attention. In this work, we determined the first hyperfine resolved rate coefficients of HC17O+ in collision with H2 (j = 0). Indeed, despite no scattering calculations on its collisional parameters have been performed so far, the HC17O+ isotope assumes a prominent role for astrophysical modelling applications. Computations are based on a new four dimensional (4D) potential energy surface obtained at the CCSD(T)-F12a/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. A test on the corresponding cross-section values pointed out that, to a good approximation, the influence of the coupling between rotational levels of H2 can be ignored. For this reason, the H2 collider has been treated as a spherical body and an average of the potential based on five orientations of H2 has been employed for scattering calculations. State-to-state rate coefficients resolved for the HC17O+ hyperfine structure for temperature ranging from 5 to 100K have been computed using recoupling techniques. This study provides the first determination of HC17O+–H2 inelastic rate coefficients directly computed from full quantum close-coupling equations, thus supporting the reliability of future radiative transfer modellings of HC17O+ in interstellar environments.
2022
Settore CHIM/02 - Chimica Fisica
ISM: abundances; molecular data; molecular processes; scattering
   MUR
   PRIN

   Consolidator Grant COLLEXISM
   European Research Council
   Grant
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11384/137527
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