n several eudicots, including members of the Asteraceae family, the CYCLOIDEA (CYC) genes, which belong to the TCP class of transcription factors, are key players for floral symmetry. The sunflower inflorescence is heterogamous (radiate capitulum) with sterile monosymmetric ray flowers located in the outermost whorl of the inflorescence and hermaphrodite polysymmetric disk flowers. In inflorescence of Heliantheae tribe, flower primordia development initiates from the marginal ray flowers while disk flowers develop later in an acropetal fashion in organized parastichies along a number found to be one of Fibonacci patterns. Mutants for inflorescence morphology can provide information on the role of CYC-like genes in radiate capitulum evolution. The tubular ray flower (turf) mutant of sunflower shows hermaphrodite ray flowers with a nearly polysymmetric tubular-like corolla. Here, we demonstrate that this mutation is caused by the insertion in the TCP motif of a sunflower CYC-like gene (HaCYC2c) of non-autonomous transposable element (TE), belonging to the CACTA superfamily of transposons. We named this element Transposable element of turf1 (Tetu1). The Tetu1 insertion changes the reading frame of turf-HaCYC2c for the encoded protein and leads to a premature stop codon. Although in Tetu1 a transposase gene is lacking, our results clearly suggest that it is an active TE. The excision of Tetu1 restores the wild type phenotype or generates stable mutants. Co-segregation and sequence analysis in progenies of F(2) and self-fertilized plants derived from reversion of turf to wild type clearly identify HaCYC2c as a key regulator of ray flowers symmetry. Also, HaCYC2c loss-of-function promotes the developmental switch from sterile to hermaphrodite flowers, revealing a novel and unexpected role for a CYC-like gene in the repression of female organs.

A transposon-mediate inactivation of a CYCLOIDEA-like gene originates polysymmetric and androgynous ray flowers in Helianthus annuus

SALVINI, Mariangela;
2012

Abstract

n several eudicots, including members of the Asteraceae family, the CYCLOIDEA (CYC) genes, which belong to the TCP class of transcription factors, are key players for floral symmetry. The sunflower inflorescence is heterogamous (radiate capitulum) with sterile monosymmetric ray flowers located in the outermost whorl of the inflorescence and hermaphrodite polysymmetric disk flowers. In inflorescence of Heliantheae tribe, flower primordia development initiates from the marginal ray flowers while disk flowers develop later in an acropetal fashion in organized parastichies along a number found to be one of Fibonacci patterns. Mutants for inflorescence morphology can provide information on the role of CYC-like genes in radiate capitulum evolution. The tubular ray flower (turf) mutant of sunflower shows hermaphrodite ray flowers with a nearly polysymmetric tubular-like corolla. Here, we demonstrate that this mutation is caused by the insertion in the TCP motif of a sunflower CYC-like gene (HaCYC2c) of non-autonomous transposable element (TE), belonging to the CACTA superfamily of transposons. We named this element Transposable element of turf1 (Tetu1). The Tetu1 insertion changes the reading frame of turf-HaCYC2c for the encoded protein and leads to a premature stop codon. Although in Tetu1 a transposase gene is lacking, our results clearly suggest that it is an active TE. The excision of Tetu1 restores the wild type phenotype or generates stable mutants. Co-segregation and sequence analysis in progenies of F(2) and self-fertilized plants derived from reversion of turf to wild type clearly identify HaCYC2c as a key regulator of ray flowers symmetry. Also, HaCYC2c loss-of-function promotes the developmental switch from sterile to hermaphrodite flowers, revealing a novel and unexpected role for a CYC-like gene in the repression of female organs.
Floral morphology; Transposable element; CYCLOIDEA-like gene
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11384/7413
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