The central challenge in 21 cm cosmology is isolating the cosmological signal from bright foregrounds. Many separation techniques rely on the accurate knowledge of the sky and the instrumental response, including the antenna primary beam. For drift-scan telescopes, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA), that do not move, primary beam characterization is particularly challenging because standard beam-calibration routines do not apply (Cornwell et al.) and current techniques require accurate source catalogs at the telescope resolution. We present an extension of the method from Pober et al. where they use beam symmetries to create a network of overlapping source tracks that break the degeneracy between source flux density and beam response and allow their simultaneous estimation. We fit the beam response of our instrument using early HERA observations and find that our results agree well with electromagnetic simulations down to a -20 dB level in power relative to peak gain for sources with high signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we construct a source catalog with 90 sources down to a flux density of 1.4 Jy at 151 MHz.

The central challenge in 21 cm cosmology is isolating the cosmological signal from bright foregrounds. Many separation techniques rely on the accurate knowledge of the sky and the instrumental response, including the antenna primary beam. For drift-scan telescopes, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA), that do not move, primary beam characterization is particularly challenging because standard beam-calibration routines do not apply (Cornwell et al.) and current techniques require accurate source catalogs at the telescope resolution. We present an extension of the method from Pober et al. where they use beam symmetries to create a network of overlapping source tracks that break the degeneracy between source flux density and beam response and allow their simultaneous estimation. We fit the beam response of our instrument using early HERA observations and find that our results agree well with electromagnetic simulations down to a -20 dB level in power relative to peak gain for sources with high signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we construct a source catalog with 90 sources down to a flux density of 1.4 Jy at 151 MHz.

Measuring HERA's Primary Beam in Situ: Methodology and First Results

Bernardi G.;Greig B.;Hewitt J. N.;Liu A.;Mesinger A.;Thyagarajan N.;
2020

Abstract

The central challenge in 21 cm cosmology is isolating the cosmological signal from bright foregrounds. Many separation techniques rely on the accurate knowledge of the sky and the instrumental response, including the antenna primary beam. For drift-scan telescopes, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA), that do not move, primary beam characterization is particularly challenging because standard beam-calibration routines do not apply (Cornwell et al.) and current techniques require accurate source catalogs at the telescope resolution. We present an extension of the method from Pober et al. where they use beam symmetries to create a network of overlapping source tracks that break the degeneracy between source flux density and beam response and allow their simultaneous estimation. We fit the beam response of our instrument using early HERA observations and find that our results agree well with electromagnetic simulations down to a -20 dB level in power relative to peak gain for sources with high signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, we construct a source catalog with 90 sources down to a flux density of 1.4 Jy at 151 MHz.
Settore FIS/05 - Astronomia e Astrofisica
Cosmology; H I line emission; Radio astronomy
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Nunhokee_2020_ApJ_897_5.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Published version
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 7.01 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
7.01 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11384/102283
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact