In the last 60 years conventional solid and electrolyte gating has allowed sizable modulations of the surface carrier concentration in metallic superconductors, resulting in tuning of their conductivity and change of their critical temperature. Recent conventional gating experiments on superconducting metal nanostructures showed full suppression of the critical current without variation of the normal-state resistance and the critical temperature. These results still lack a microscopic explanation. In this article, we describe a complete set of gating experiments on Ti-based superconducting Dayem-bridges and a proposed classical thermodynamic model that seems to account for several of our experimental findings. In particular, zero-bias resistance and critical-current IC measurements highlight the following: The suppression of IC with both polarities of gate voltage, the surface nature of the effect, the independence of critical temperature from the electric field, and the gate-induced growth of a subgap dissipative component. In addition, the temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current seems to show a transition from ballistic Kulik-Omelyanchuk behavior to Ambegaokar-Baratoff tunnellike behavior on increase of the electric field. Furthermore, the IC suppression persists in the presence of sizable perpendicular-to-plane magnetic fields. We propose a classical thermodynamic model able to describe some of the experimental observations of the present and previous work. Above all, the model grabs the bipolar-electric-field-induced suppression of IC and the emergence of a subgap dissipative component near full suppression of the supercurrent. Finally, applications using the effect discussed are proposed.

Magnetotransport experiments on fully metallic superconducting dayem-bridge field-effect transistors

Paolucci F.
;
De Simoni G.;Strambini E.;Ligato N.;Braggio A.;Giazotto F.
2019

Abstract

In the last 60 years conventional solid and electrolyte gating has allowed sizable modulations of the surface carrier concentration in metallic superconductors, resulting in tuning of their conductivity and change of their critical temperature. Recent conventional gating experiments on superconducting metal nanostructures showed full suppression of the critical current without variation of the normal-state resistance and the critical temperature. These results still lack a microscopic explanation. In this article, we describe a complete set of gating experiments on Ti-based superconducting Dayem-bridges and a proposed classical thermodynamic model that seems to account for several of our experimental findings. In particular, zero-bias resistance and critical-current IC measurements highlight the following: The suppression of IC with both polarities of gate voltage, the surface nature of the effect, the independence of critical temperature from the electric field, and the gate-induced growth of a subgap dissipative component. In addition, the temperature dependence of the Josephson critical current seems to show a transition from ballistic Kulik-Omelyanchuk behavior to Ambegaokar-Baratoff tunnellike behavior on increase of the electric field. Furthermore, the IC suppression persists in the presence of sizable perpendicular-to-plane magnetic fields. We propose a classical thermodynamic model able to describe some of the experimental observations of the present and previous work. Above all, the model grabs the bipolar-electric-field-induced suppression of IC and the emergence of a subgap dissipative component near full suppression of the supercurrent. Finally, applications using the effect discussed are proposed.
Settore FIS/03 - Fisica della Materia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11384/110088
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